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Definition of Building Code

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Building Code

A comprehensive set of laws that controls the construction or remodeling of a home or other structure.



Related Terms:

Framer

The carpenter contractor that installs the lumber and erects the frame, flooring system, interior walls, backing, trusses, rafters, decking, installs all beams, stairs, soffits and all work related to the wood structure of the home. The framer builds the home according to the blueprints and must comply with local building codes and regulations.


Zoning

A governmental process and specification which limits the use of a property e.g. single family use, high-rise residential use, industrial use, etc. Zoning laws may limit where you can locate a structure. Also see building code.


Incontestable Clause

This clause in regular life insurance policy provides for voiding the contract of insurance for up to two years from the date of issue of the coverage if the life insured has failed to disclose important information or if there has been a misrepresentation of a material fact which would have prevented the coverage from being issued in the first place. After the end of two years from issue, a misrepresentation of smoking habits or age can still void or change the policy.


Non-Medical Limit

This is the maximum value of a policy that an insurance company will issue without the applicant taking a medical examination, although medical questions are invariably asked during the application process. When a non-medical issue is made through group insurance, in most cases, medical data is not requested at all.


Structured Settlement

Historically, damages paid out during settlement of personal physical injury cases were distributed in the form of a lump-sum cash payment to the plaintiff. This windfall was intended to provide for a lifetime of medical and income needs. The claimant or his/her family was then forced into the position of becoming the manager of a large sum of money.
In an effort to create a more financially stable arrangement for the claimant, the structured settlement was developed. A structured settlement is an alternative to a lump sum cash payment in the resolution of personal physical injury, wrongful death, or workers’ compensation cases. The settlement usually consists of two components: an up-front cash payment to provide for immediate needs and a series of future periodic payments which are funded by the defendant’s purchase of one or more annuity policies. Those payors make payments directly to the claimant. In the unfortunate event of the claimant’s death, a guaranteed portion of the settlement may be directed to a beneficiary or his/her estate.
A structured settlement is a guaranteed source of funds paid to the claimant or his/her family on a tax-free basis.



Suicide Clause

Generally, a suicide clause in a regular life insurance policy provides for voiding the contract of insurance if the life insured commits suicide within two years of the date of issue of the coverage.


Viatical Settlement

A dictionary meaning for the word viatica is "the eucharist as given to a dying person or to one in danger of death". In the context of Viatical settlement it means the selling of one's own life insurance policy to another in exchange for an immediate percentage of the death benefit. The person or in many cases, group of persons buying the rights to the policy have high expectation of the imminent death of the previous owner. The sooner the death of the previous owner, the higher the profit. Consumer knowledge about this subject is poor and little is known about the entities that fund the companies that purchase policies. People should be very careful when considering the sale of their policy, and they should remember a sale of their life insurance means some group of strangers now owns a contract on their life. If a senior finds it difficult to pay for an insurance policy it might be a better choice to request that current beneficiaries take over the burden of paying the premium. The practice selling personal life insurance policies common in the United States and is spilling over into Canada. It would appear to have a definite conflict with Canada's historical view of 'insurable interest'.


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Asset

all things of value owned by an individual or organization.


Premium Offset

After premiums have been paid for a number of years, further annual premiums may be paid by the current dividends and the surrender of some of the paid-up additions which have built up in the policy. In effect, the policy can begin to pay for itself. Whether a policy becomes eligible for premium offset, the date on which it becomes eligible and whether it remains eligible once premium offset begins, will all depend on how the dividend scale changes over the years. Since dividends are not guaranteed, premium offset cannot be guaranteed either.


Gross Household Income

Gross household income is the total salary, wages, commissions and other assured income, before deductions, by all household members who are co-applicants for the mortgage.


High Ratio Mortgage

If you don't have 20% of the lesser of the purchase price or appraised value of the property, your mortgage must be insured against payment default by a Mortgage Insurer, such as CMHC.


Home Equity

The difference between the price for which a home could be sold (market value) and the total debts registered against it.


Coach home

One of a group of homes in a two-story Building, with own garage and entrance.


Courtyard home

A home with a courtyard as its main entrance.


Home warranty

Like any other warranty, this guarantees the property against failure of mechanical systems, such as plumbing, electrical, heating and installed appliances.


Patio home

Small, single-family home with a patio.


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Single-family home

A detached house.


Townhouse

One of a row of houses connected with common side walls.



Allowance

A sum of money set aside in the construction contract for items which have not been selected and specified in the construction contract. For example, selection of tile as a flooring may require an allowance for an underlayment material, or an electrical allowance which sets aside an amount of money to be spent on electrical fixtures.


Area Walls

Corrugated metal or concrete barrier walls installed around a basement window to hold back the earth.


Backing

frame lumber installed between the wall studs to give additional support for drywall or an interior trim related item, such as handrail brackets, cabinets, and towel bars. In this way, items are screwed and mounted into solid wood rather than weak drywall that may allow the item to break loose from the wall. Carpet backing holds the pile fabric in place.


Ballast

A transformer that steps up the voltage in a florescent lamp.


Balloon

A loan that has a series of monthly payments with the remaining balance due in a large lump sum payment at the end.


Balloon Framed Wall

framed walls (generally over 10' tall) that run the entire vertical length from the floor sill plate to the roof. This is done to eliminate the need for a gable end truss.


Bull Nose Drywall

Rounded drywall corners.


Construction Documents

all drawings, specifications and addenda associated with a specific construction project.


Ductwork

A system of large tubes, pipes or channels (ducts) designed to deliver air to and from a furnace or other air-handling unit.


Fuse

A device often found in older homes designed to prevent overloads in electrical lines. See Circuit Breakers.



Gable End Wall

The triangular end of an exterior wall above the eaves formed under a gable roof.


High Voltage System

See Electricity.


Inset Staple

Stapling to the inside portion of the stud or rafter.


Interior Finish



aterial used to cover the interior framed areas of walls and ceilings



Knee Wall

A wall-like structure that supports roof rafters.


Load-Bearing Wall

Includes all exterior walls and any interior wall that is aligned above a support beam or girder. Normally, any wall that has a double horizontal top plate.


Low-Voltage System

Provides security, entertainment, communications, environmental control, networking, and other functions generally powered by a signal cable, phone line or data cable. Is not typically metered.


Nonbearing Wall

A wall supporting no load other than its own weight.


Palladian Window

One larger window with a circle top window above and usually has two smaller, rectangular windows on each side.


Radiant Barrier System

A Radiant Barrier system (RBS) is a Building section that includes a radiant barrier facing an air space.


Reflective Insulation System

Reflective Insulation system is formed by a combination of low emittance surfaces and air spaces that provide reflective cavities, which have low levels of radiant energy transmission.


Riser

Vertical boards between the steps of a stairway.


Roof Valley

The "V" created where two sloping roofs meet.


Stick-Built Home

A house built without prefabricated parts. Also called conventional Building.


Trombe Wall

A passive solar wall, usually masonry or concrete, used for passing heat from one room (like a sun room or solar garden room) to another.


Wall Out

When a painter spray paints the interior of a home.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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