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Definition of Basement Foundation

Basement Foundation Image 1

Basement Foundation

A basement is a usable foundation that typically has ceiling heights of 8' and is often finished off as living or storage space.



Related Terms:

Crawlspace Foundation

The space between the ground and the first floor of a home, usually no higher than four feet.


Slab Foundation

For a slab foundation, the site is leveled off, and a trench is dug around the perimeter of the home site. Gravel is then spread across the site, and concrete is poured approximately four inches thick over wire mesh and a moisture barrier. In areas of load bearing walls, trenches need to be dug to allow for additional thickness at this location. Slab foundations have no piers or floor joists, and the concrete slab is the floor system.


Backfill

The replacement of excavated earth into a trench around or against a basement or crawlspace foundation wall.


Crawlspace Vent

An opening to allow the passage of air through the unexcavated area under a first floor. Ideally there should be at least two vents per crawlspace.


Monolithic Slab

A slab foundation that is part of the footings.



First To Die Coverage

this means that there are two or more life insured on the same policy but the death benefit is paid out on the first death only. If two or more persons at the same address are purchasing life insurance at the same time, it is wise to compare the cost of this kind of coverage with individual policies having a multiple policy discount.


Last To Die Coverage

this means that there are two or more life insured on the same policy but the death benefit is paid out on the last person to die. The cost of this type of coverage is much less than a first to die policy and it is generally used to protect estate value for children where there might be substantial capital gains taxes due upon the death of the last parent. this kind of policy is also valuable when one of two people covered has health problems which would prohibit obtaining individual coverage.


Basement Foundation Image 1

Living Benefit

Some insurance companies include this benefit option at no cost to their policy holders. The insurer considers on a case to case basis, the need for insurance funds before death. If the insured can demonstrate a shortened life of less than two years and with some insurers one year, the insurer will consider releasing up to 50% or a maximum of $100,000 of the life insurance coverage held by the insured. Not all insurers offer this benefit for free. The need has resulted in specific stand alone living benefit/critical illness policies coming into existence. Look under "Different types of Life Insurance" for further information. You might have heard of "Viatical Settlements", the practice of seriously ill people selling the rights to their life insurance policies to third parties. this practice is common in the United States but has not caught on in Canada.


Living Will

this is a will which specifically expresses the testator's desire not to be kept alive on life support machines, should the occasion arise.


Agreement of Purchase and Sale

A legal agreement that offers a certain price for a home. The offer may be firm (no conditions attached), or conditional (certain conditions must be fulfilled before the deal can be closed).


Certificate of Location or Survey

A document specifying the exact location of the building on the property and describing the type and size of the building including additions, if any.


Home Equity

The difference between the price for which a home could be sold (market value) and the total debts registered against it.


Coach home

One of a group of homes in a two-story building, with own garage and entrance.


Courtyard home

A home with a courtyard as its main entrance.


Home warranty

Like any other warranty, this guarantees the property against failure of mechanical systems, such as plumbing, electrical, heating and installed appliances.


Patio home

Small, single-family home with a patio.


Basement Foundation Image 2

Single-family home

A detached house.


Tray ceiling

A flat ceiling with a raised center portion.



Vaulted ceiling

An arched ceiling.


Air Space

The area between insulation facing and interior of exterior wall coverings. Normally a 1" air gap.


Allowance

A sum of money set aside in the construction contract for items which have not been selected and specified in the construction contract. For example, selection of tile as a flooring may require an allowance for an underlayment material, or an electrical allowance which sets aside an amount of money to be spent on electrical fixtures.


Area Walls

Corrugated metal or concrete barrier walls installed around a basement window to hold back the earth.


Coffered Ceiling

A ceiling with recessed square panels, bordered with trim for ornamental purposes.


Concrete Block

A hollow concrete 'brick' often 8" x 8" x 16" in size. often used in low rise commercial and some residential construction. The original design and use is attributed to the architect Frank Lloyd Wright.


Crawlspace Vent

An opening to allow the passage of air through the unexcavated area under a first floor. Ideally there should be at least two vents per crawlspace.


Flat Ceiling

A ceiling with no change in elevation.


GFI -See Ground Fault Current Interrupter



Ground Fault Current Interrupter

An electrical device used to prevent injury from contact with faulty electrical appliances and faulty wiring
electrical shocks. GFIs should not be confused with AFIs, the later are designed to prevent electrical fires. GFIs are required in new home bathrooms, kitchen, garage, out of doors and in other locations where one might be in contact with a grounded surface or body of water and an electrical appliance. Most GFI's are located in the receptacle itself or a curcuit breaker and can be identified by the presence of a 'test' and a 'reset' button.



High Voltage System

See Electricity.


Insulated Ceiling (I.C.)

Marking on recessed lighting fixture indicating that it is designed for direct insulation contact.


aterial used to cover the interior framed areas of walls and ceilings



Living Square Footage

See Square Footage, living


Load-Bearing Point

A point where a bearing or structural weight is concentrated and transferred to the foundation.


Load-Bearing Wall

Includes all exterior walls and any interior wall that is aligned above a support beam or girder. Normally, any wall that has a double horizontal top plate.


Low-Voltage System

Provides security, entertainment, communications, environmental control, networking, and other functions generally powered by a signal cable, phone line or data cable. Is not typically metered.


Monolithic Slab

A Slab foundation that is part of the footings.


Nonbearing Wall

A wall supporting no load other than its own weight.


Overhang

Part of the roof that hangs over the wall.


Polyethylene Vapor Barrier

Plastic film used to prevent moisture from passing through unfaced insulation. Both 4- and 6-mil polyethylene are preferred because they are less likely to be damaged during construction.


Radiant Barrier

A radiant barrier is a reflective surface, on or near a building component, that intercepts the flow of radiant energy to and from the building component.


Radiant Barrier System

A Radiant barrier system (RBS) is a building section that includes a radiant barrier facing an air space.


Reflective Insulation System

Reflective Insulation system is formed by a combination of low emittance surfaces and air spaces that provide reflective cavities, which have low levels of radiant energy transmission.


Square Footage, Living

The square footage in a home that is heated and/or cooled. The space occupied by two-story rooms and stairwells is counted once in the lower floor's square footage. living square footage does not include garages, bonus rooms, or porches unless otherwise noted.


Stick-Built Home

A house built without prefabricated parts. Also called conventional building.


Subfloor

The structural material that spans across floor joists. It serves as a working platform during construction and provides a base for the finish floor.


Tray Ceiling

A decorative ceiling treatment used to add volume and/or height to a room. 2 Common types are: 1) Angled area toward the center leading to a flat ceiling surface, and 2) Stepped square edged leading toward the center of the ceiling.


Vaulted Ceiling

A ceiling that angles upward on one or both sides to create volume in the room.


Wire Nut

A plastic device used to connect bare wires together.


Yard of Concrete

One cubic yard of concrete is 3' x 3' x 3' in volume, or 27 cubic feet. One cubic yard of concrete will pour 80 square feet of 3 ˝" sidewalk or basement/garage floor.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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