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Definition of Electrical Rough

Electrical Rough Image 1

Electrical Rough

Work performed by the electrical Contractor after the plumber and heating contractor are complete with their phase of work. Normally all electrical wires, and outlet, switch, and fixture boxes are installed (before insulation).



Related Terms:

Electrical Service Panel

Refers to the high-voltage electrical system's first point of entry into a home beyond the meter.


Walk Through

A final inspection of a home before "closing" to look for and document problems that need to be corrected.


Backout

Work the framing contractor does after the mechanical (heating, plumbing & electrical) subcontractors finish their phase of work at the rough stage prior to insulating to get the home ready for a municipal frame inspection. Generally, the framing contractor repairs anything disturbed by others and completes all framing necessary to pass a rough Frame Inspection.


Circuit Breaker

A device which looks like a switch and is usually located inside the electrical panel or circuit breaker box. It is designed to (1) shut of the power to portions or all of the house and (2) to limit the amount of power flowing through a circuit (measured in amperes). 110 volt household circuits require a fuse or circuit breaker with a rating of 15 or a maximum of 20 amps. '220' volt circuits may be designed for higher amperage loads e.g. a hot water heater may be designed for a 30 amp load and would therefore need a 30 amp fuse or breaker. also see GFI


Debt-Service Ratio

The percentage of the borrower's gross income that will be used for monthly payments of principal, interest, taxes, heating costs and condominium fees.



Gross Debt Service (GDS) Ratio

The percentage of gross income required to cover monthly payments associated with housing costs. Most lenders recommend that the GDS ratio be no more than 32% of your gross (before tax) monthly income.


Total Debt Service (TDS) Ratio

The percentage of gross income needed to cover monthly payments for housing and all other debts and financing obligations. The total should generally not exceed 37% of gross monthly income.


Electrical Rough Image 1

Widow's Walk

A platform with a rail around it, built onto the roof of a house. The platform is accessible by stairs or a ladder from the interior of the house. See Plan #10433 for an example.


First To Die Coverage

This means that there are two or more life insured on the same policy but the death benefit is paid out on the first death only. If two or more persons at the same address are purchasing life insurance at the same time, it is wise to compare the cost of this kind of coverage with individual policies having a multiple policy discount.


Inspection Report

This is a telephone interview of the person applying for life insurance conducted by someone from the underwriting department of the insurance company. Some insurance companies only sporadically contact applicants and some contact every applicant. On average the interview lasts between 15 to 30 minutes. The questions asked relate to personal habits (like smoking and alcohol consumption) and finances, including income and net worth, confirmation of employment, duties and the nature of the applicant's business. In addition, there are questions about driving, sports, aviation and currently held insurance. all information obtained is strictly confidential and is submitted solely to the underwriter for review.


Re-entry

This is a provision in some term insurance policies that allow the insured the right to renew the policy at a more favourable rate by providing updated evidence of insurability.


Closing Costs

Various expenses associated with purchasing a home. These costs can include, but are not limited to, legal/notary fees and disbursements, property land transfer taxes, as well as adjustments for prepaid property taxes or condominium common expenses, if any.


Closing Date

The date on which the sale of a property becomes final and the new owner usually takes possession.


High Ratio Mortgage

If you don't have 20% of the lesser of the purchase price or appraised value of the property, your mortgage must be insured against payment default by a Mortgage Insurer, such as CMHC.


Home Equity

The difference between the price for which a home could be sold (market value) and the total debts registered against it.


Inspection

The examination of the house by a building inspector selected by the purchaser.


Electrical Rough Image 1

Closing

The meeting at which the sale of a property is finalized. The buyer signs the lender agreement for the mortgage and pays closing costs and escrow amounts. The buyer and seller sign documents to transfer ownership of the property. Also known as the settlement.


Coach home

One of a group of homes in a two-story building, with own garage and entrance.



Courtyard home

A home with a courtyard as its main entrance.


Home warranty

Like any other warranty, this guarantees the property against failure of mechanical systems, such as plumbing, electrical, heating and installed appliances.


Patio home

Small, single-family home with a patio.


Point

A point equals 1 percent of a mortgage loan. Lenders charge points as a way to make a profit.


Single-family home

A detached house.


Allowance

A sum of money set aside in the construction contract for items which have not been selected and specified in the construction contract. For example, selection of tile as a flooring may require an allowance for an underlayment material, or an electrical allowance which sets aside an amount of money to be spent on electrical fixtures.


Area Walls

Corrugated metal or concrete barrier walls installed around a basement window to hold back the earth.


Ballast

A transformer that steps up the voltage in a florescent lamp.


Balloon

A loan that has a series of monthly payments with the remaining balance due in a large lump sum payment at the end.


Electrical Rough Image 2

Balloon Framed Wall

Framed walls (generally over 10' tall) that run the entire vertical length from the floor sill plate to the roof. This is done to eliminate the need for a gable end truss.



Bull Nose Drywall

Rounded drywall corners.


Construction Documents

all drawings, specifications and addenda associated with a specific construction project.


Ductwork

A system of large tubes, pipes or channels (ducts) designed to deliver air to and from a furnace or other air-handling unit.


Entry Box

See electrical Service entry


Faced Insulation

insulation with an attached vapor retarder (kraft paper or foil-backed paper).


Fiber Glass Insulation

An energy-efficient glass fiber product manufactured by Owens Corning to ensure the best thermal and noise control performance available.


Forced Air Heating

A common form of heating with natural gas, propane, oil or electricity as a fuel. Air is heated in the furnace and distributed through a set of metal ducts to various areas of the house.


Gable End Wall

The triangular end of an exterior wall above the eaves formed under a gable roof.


High Voltage System

See Electricity.


Insulation Density

Denser insulation products have more fibers per square inch and, therefore, give you greater insulating power through higher R-values.


aterial used to cover the interior framed areas of walls and ceilings



Knee Wall

A wall-like structure that supports roof rafters.


Load-Bearing Point

A point where a bearing or structural weight is concentrated and transferred to the foundation.


Load-Bearing Wall

Includes all exterior walls and any interior wall that is aligned above a support beam or girder. Normally, any wall that has a double horizontal top plate.


Low-Voltage System

Provides security, entertainment, communications, environmental control, networking, and other functions generally powered by a signal cable, phone line or data cable. Is not typically metered.


Metal Insulation Support

16" or 24" wire rod or crisscrossed wire to hold floor insulation in place.


Nonbearing Wall

A wall supporting no load other than its own weight.


Palladian Window

One larger window with a circle top window above and usually has two smaller, rectangular windows on each side.


Pointing

Treatment of joints in masonry by filling with mortar to improve appearance or protect against weather.


Radiant Barrier System

A Radiant Barrier system (RBS) is a building section that includes a radiant barrier facing an air space.


Rafter

One of a series of beams that form the slope of a pitched roof and are analogous to floor joists.


Reflective Insulation System

Reflective insulation system is formed by a combination of low emittance surfaces and air spaces that provide reflective cavities, which have low levels of radiant energy transmission.


Roof Valley

The "V" created where two sloping roofs meet.


Stick-Built Home

A house built without prefabricated parts. Also called conventional building.


Trombe Wall

A passive solar wall, usually masonry or concrete, used for passing heat from one room (like a sun room or solar garden room) to another.


Un-faced Insulation

insulation with no attached vapor retarder.


Wall Out

When a painter spray paints the interior of a home.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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