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Definition of Area Walls

Area Walls Image 1

Area Walls

Corrugated metal or concrete barrier walls installed around a basement window to hold back the earth.



Related Terms:

aterial used to cover the interior framed areas of walls and ceilings



Slab Foundation

For a slab foundation, the site is leveled off, and a trench is dug around the perimeter of the home site. Gravel is then spread across the site, and concrete is poured approximately four inches thick over wire mesh and a moisture barrier. In areas of load bearing walls, trenches need to be dug to allow for additional thickness at this location. Slab foundations have no piers or floor joists, and the concrete slab is the floor system.


First To Die Coverage

This means that there are two or more life insured on the same policy but the death benefit is paid out on the first death only. If two or more persons at the same address are purchasing life insurance at the same time, it is wise to compare the cost of this kind of coverage with individual policies having a multiple policy discount.


Last To Die Coverage

This means that there are two or more life insured on the same policy but the death benefit is paid out on the last person to die. The cost of this type of coverage is much less than a first to die policy and it is generally used to protect estate value for children where there might be substantial capital gains taxes due upon the death of the last parent. This kind of policy is also valuable when one of two people covered has health problems which would prohibit obtaining individual coverage.


Balloon Framed Wall

framed walls (generally over 10' tall) that run the entire vertical length from the floor sill plate to the roof. This is done to eliminate the need for a gable end truss.



Basement Foundation

A basement is a usable foundation that typically has ceiling heights of 8' and is often finished off as living or storage space.


Crawlspace Foundation

The space between the ground and the first floor of a home, usually no higher than four feet.


Area Walls Image 1

Interior Finish



Monolithic Slab

A slab foundation that is part of the footings.


Backdating

A procedure for making the effective date of a policy earlier than the application date. backdating is often used to make the age of the consumer at policy issue lower than it actually was in order to get a lower premium.


Back To Back Annuity

this term refers to the simultaneous issue of a life annuity with a non-guaranteed period and a guaranteed life insurance policy [usually whole life or term to 100]. The face value of the life insurance would be the same amount that was used to purchase the annuity. this combination of life annuity providing the highest payout of all types of annuities, along with a guaranteed life insurance policy allowed an uninsurable person to convert his/her RRSP into the best choice of annuity and guarantee that upon his/her death, the full value of the annuity would be paid tax free through the life insurance policy to his family members. However, in the early 1990's, the Federal tax authorities put a stop to the issuing of standard life rates to rated or uninsurable applicants. Insuring a life annuity in this manner is still an excellent way to provide guaranteed tax free funds to family members but the application for the annuity and the application for the life insurance are separate transactions and today, most likely conducted through two different insurance companies so that there is no suspicion of preferential treatment given to the life insurance application.


First To Die Coverage

this means that there are two or more life insured on the same policy but the death benefit is paid out on the first death only. If two or more persons at the same address are purchasing life insurance at the same time, it is wise to compare the cost of this kind of coverage with individual policies having a multiple policy discount.


Last To Die Coverage

this means that there are two or more life insured on the same policy but the death benefit is paid out on the last person to die. The cost of this type of coverage is much less than a first to die policy and it is generally used to protect estate value for children where there might be substantial capital gains taxes due upon the death of the last parent. this kind of policy is also valuable when one of two people covered has health problems which would prohibit obtaining individual coverage.


Policyholder

this is the person who owns a life insurance policy. this is usually the insured person, but it may also be a relative of the insured, a partnership or a corporation. There are instances in marriage breakup (or relationship breakup with dependent children) where appropriate life insurance on the support provider, owned and paid for by the ex-spouse receiving the support is an acceptable method of ensuring future security.


Certificate of Location or Survey

A document specifying the exact location of the building on the property and describing the type and size of the building including additions, if any.


Gross Household Income

Gross household income is the total salary, wages, commissions and other assured income, before deductions, by all household members who are co-applicants for the mortgage.


Area Walls Image 1

Holdback

An amount of money required to be withheld by the lender during the construction or renovation of a house to ensure that construction is satisfactorily completed at every stage.


Home Equity

The difference between the price for which a home could be sold (market value) and the total debts registered against it.



Coach home

One of a group of homes in a two-story building, with own garage and entrance.


Courtyard home

A home with a courtyard as its main entrance.


Home warranty

Like any other warranty, this guarantees the property against failure of mechanical systems, such as plumbing, electrical, heating and installed appliances.


Patio home

Small, single-family home with a patio.


Single-family home

A detached house.


Allowance

A sum of money set aside in the construction contract for items which have not been selected and specified in the construction contract. For example, selection of tile as a flooring may require an allowance for an underlayment material, or an electrical allowance which sets aside an amount of money to be spent on electrical fixtures.


Awning Windows

Single level windows that tilt outward and up.


Back Charge

Billings for work performed or costs incurred by one party that, in accordance with the agreement, should have been performed or incurred by the party to whom billed. Owners bill back charges to general contractors, and general contractors bill back charges to subcontractors. Examples of back charges include charges for cleanup work or to repair something damaged by another subcontractor, such as a tub chip or broken window.


Backfill

The replacement of excavated earth into a trench around or against a basement or crawlspace foundation wall.


Area Walls Image 2

Backing

Frame lumber installed between the wall studs to give additional support for drywall or an interior trim related item, such as handrail brackets, cabinets, and towel bars. In this way, items are screwed and mounted into solid wood rather than weak drywall that may allow the item to break loose from the wall. Carpet backing holds the pile fabric in place.



Backout

Work the framing contractor does after the mechanical (heating, plumbing & electrical) subcontractors finish their phase of work at the rough stage prior to insulating to get the home ready for a municipal frame inspection. Generally, the framing contractor repairs anything disturbed by others and completes all framing necessary to pass a Rough Frame Inspection.


Basement Foundation

A basement is a usable foundation that typically has ceiling heights of 8' and is often finished off as living or storage space.


Bay Window

A window that projects outward in a curve.


Concrete Block

A hollow concrete 'brick' often 8" x 8" x 16" in size. Often used in low rise commercial and some residential construction. The original design and use is attributed to the architect Frank Lloyd Wright.


Crawlspace Foundation

The space between the ground and the first floor of a home, usually no higher than four feet.


Dormer Windows

Dormers are located on the second floor and project or extend out through the roof to provide window space.


High Voltage System

See Electricity.


Load-Bearing Point

A point where a bearing or structural weight is concentrated and transferred to the foundation.


Load-Bearing Wall

Includes all exterior walls and any interior wall that is aligned above a support beam or girder. Normally, any wall that has a double horizontal top plate.


Low-Voltage System

Provides security, entertainment, communications, environmental control, networking, and other functions generally powered by a signal cable, phone line or data cable. Is not typically metered.


Metal Flue

A metal channel through which hot air, gas, steam or smoke may pass.


Metal Insulation Support

16" or 24" wire rod or crisscrossed wire to hold floor insulation in place.


Monolithic Slab

A Slab foundation that is part of the footings.


Nonbearing Wall

A wall supporting no load other than its own weight.


Overhang

Part of the roof that hangs over the wall.


Palladian Window

One larger window with a circle top window above and usually has two smaller, rectangular windows on each side.


Polyethylene Vapor Barrier

Plastic film used to prevent moisture from passing through unfaced insulation. Both 4- and 6-mil polyethylene are preferred because they are less likely to be damaged during construction.


Radiant Barrier

A radiant barrier is a reflective surface, on or near a building component, that intercepts the flow of radiant energy to and from the building component.


Radiant Barrier System

A Radiant barrier system (RBS) is a building section that includes a radiant barrier facing an air space.


Radius Window

A window with an arched top.


Reflective Insulation System

Reflective Insulation system is formed by a combination of low emittance surfaces and air spaces that provide reflective cavities, which have low levels of radiant energy transmission.


Stick-Built Home

A house built without prefabricated parts. Also called conventional building.


Subfloor

The structural material that spans across floor joists. It serves as a working platform during construction and provides a base for the finish floor.


Window Buck

Square or rectangular box that is installed within a concrete foundation or block wall. A window will eventually be installed in this "buck" during the siding stage of construction.


Window Sash

The operating or movable part of a window; the sash is made of window panes and their border.


Wire Nut

A plastic device used to connect bare wires together.


Yard of Concrete

One cubic yard of concrete is 3' x 3' x 3' in volume, or 27 cubic feet. One cubic yard of concrete will pour 80 square feet of 3 ˝" sidewalk or basement/garage floor.



 

 

 

 

 

 

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